Wills & Estate Planning

Who needs to make a Will?

The answer is Everyone. In particular, anyone with dependant relatives, (children under the age of 18, elderly relatives or relatives with a disability who have special needs), anyone who owns property or has any type of asset which you would wish relatives, friends or charities to benefit from.

Your Will tells everyone what should happen to your money, possessions and property after you die (all these things together are called your ‘estate’). If you don’t leave a Will, the law decides how your estate is passed on – and this may not be in line with your wishes. It’s easy to make a will – and it will save your family unnecessary distress at an already difficult time.

  • A Will makes it much easier for your family or friends to sort everything out when you die – without a will the process can be more time consuming and stressful.
  • If you don’t write a Will, everything you own will be shared out in a standard way defined by the law – which isn’t always the way you might want.
  • A Will can help reduce the amount of Inheritance Tax that may be payable on the value of the property and money you leave behind.
  • Writing a Will is especially important if you have children or other family who depend on you financially, or if you want to leave something to people outside your

 

Why use DanJo & Co?

  • Happy to visit clients at home for no extra charge
  • Able to come visit client’s evenings and weekends
  • Specialists in family protection and insurance
  • Committed to TCF (treating customers fairly)
  • Carry £2,000,000 of professional indemnity cover
  • Covered for £5,000,000 in the event of public liability
  • CRB checked to ensure Fit & Proper status at all times

Appointing Guardians

Why appoint Guardians? If you fail to appoint guardians in your Will and your children are orphaned before they reach 18, the courts will appoint guardians instead, but they won’t necessarily choose the people that you would have preferred to take care of your children. If when you pass away the other parent of your children survives, the surviving parent will normally continue to have full responsibility for the children. However, if neither parent survives (as in some road accidents) then the guardians you have appointed will take on the responsibility for your children.

By appointing guardians you can ensure that your children are looked after by the people that you have chosen as the best people for the job.